08 December 2021 Industry News

Japanese billionaire heads to the ISS for a 12 day stay

Spaceflight participant Yozo Hiro, Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin and spaceflight participant Yusaku Maezawa. Image: Roscosmos
Spaceflight participant Yozo Hiro, Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin and spaceflight participant Yusaku Maezawa. Image: Roscosmos

A Russian rocket lifted off on Wednesday carrying a Japanese billionaire to the International Space Station, marking the country's return to space tourism after a decade-long pause that saw the rise of competition from privately held US companies.

Online fashion tycoon Yusaku Maezawa and his production assistant Yozo Hirano blasted off from the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 0738 GMT, an AFP correspondent at the scene said.

Their journey aboard the three-person Soyuz spacecraft piloted by cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin will take just over six hours, capping a banner year that many have seen as a turning point for private space travel.

On launch day, Maezawa and his crew left their hotel in Baikonur to a Soviet-era song played for all cosmonauts ahead of their flights. The song, about cosmonauts missing home, was sung partially in Japanese.

Maezawa's family and friends -- some holding Japanese flags -- waved him off as he was driven to get his spacesuit fitted.

"Dream come true," the tycoon tweeted on Wednesday morning.

Fellow billionaires Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson all made breakthrough commercial tourism flights this year, bursting into a market Russia is keen to defend.

After docking at the Poisk module of the Russian segment of the ISS, the trio will spend 12 days on the station. The Japanese tourists plan to document their daily life aboard the ISS to share on Maezawa's popular YouTube channel.

The 46-year-old billionaire has set out 100 tasks to complete while on board, including hosting a badminton tournament in orbit.

The ISS is home to an international crew of seven people including two Russian cosmonauts and a Japanese astronaut.

Maezawa, who is a space enthusiast, also plans to take eight people with him on a 2023 mission around the moon operated by Musk's SpaceX. He and his assistant will be the first private Japanese citizens to visit space since journalist Toyohiro Akiyama travelled to the Mir space station in 1990.

Before its pause from the industry, Russia had a history of shepherding self-funded tourists to space. In partnership with US-based company Space Adventures, the Roscosmos space agency has taken eight tourists to the space station since 2001 -- one of them twice.

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