19 February 2018 reviews

Stargazing: Beginners Guide to Astronomy

Published by Collins in association with the Royal Greenwich Observatory, this book will provide any budding astronomer with a practical and engaging introduction to the subject.

‘Stargazing’ is everything you’d expect from a beginner’s guide to astronomy in a small, dense and very affordable package. Although some will find the white text on a black background slightly uncomfortable to read, the book’s image-based design and semi-gloss paper makes for an attractive presentation.

Following an overview of celestial objects (the usual suspects), it covers everything from dark adaptation and seeing colour to star charts and astronomical software. Later sections describe using telescopes, binoculars and cameras, and a good proportion of the book is dedicated to observing the constellations and other objects (again replete with star charts and colour photos).

Finally, there are several pages of seasonal charts, viewed both towards north and south and from London, England, and Sydney, Australia. The back cover bills it as, ‘The perfect beginners guide to Astronomy’ and, while one usually takes such publishing hype with a pinch of salt, in this case it’s hard to disagree.

Mark Williamson

Popular articles

Popular articles

An artistic interpretation of Omaha Crater. At the far lakeside is a hydroelectric turbine which stores energy by pumping brine from lower to upper hydroelectric brine reservoirs. A reservoir pairing and habitation modules are shown at right. Specials

Developing Mars

Astronautics

Future Cubesat swarms pose significant communications challenges

Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne, a twostage, expendable rocket that launches from a dedicated 747-400 carrier aircraft, called Cosmic Girl has been contracted for launches to replenish the OneWeb constellation and for the GomSpace ADS-B and AIS monitoring Astronautics

Transforming the launch market for small spacecraft