03 September 2015 News

Cassini discovers potentially ‘younger’ ring portion on Saturn

A new study in Icarus journal by Cassini scientists suggests that one of the rings on the gas giant is not like the others.

A higher-that-expected temperature of a part of one of the rings has suggested to the Cassini team that the middle of Saturn’s A ring is potentially much younger than the rest of the rings. You can read about one potential theory as to why that is here.

In general, Saturn’s rings have fascinated science for years. Although Galileo first observed them in 1610 (he quite confused by them), there is still no consensus as to how they formed.

Cassini will make a final series of close approaches to Saturn soon – which may give us more information on the rings and how they ultimately formed, including potential mass measurements.

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