September 02, 2015 News

Getting to know the 100 Mars One finalists

The final 100 Mars One candidates are continuing to make waves in the press – as others ponder the seeming strangeness of their one-way mission.

The final 100 Mars One candidates are continuing to make waves in the press – as others ponder the seeming strangeness of their one-way mission.

The Mars One mission, founded in 2011, plans to land four human beings on Mars as early as 2027. And they launched a competition to determine the final 24 colonisers, who are supposed to travel to the Red Planet in groups of four. It will be a one-way ticket. None expect to go back.

Of course, the non-profit Mars One mission has been derided as foolhardy and dangerously limited in resources – or else just a publicity stunt. Some have even argued that Mars One is one giant scam. For now though, the company continues towards its goal.

Right now, the pool has been whittled down to just 100 contestants. Details about them are emerging.

For example, candidate Laurel Kaye has spoken to Tech Times about her desire to go to Mars.

Then there’s Sue Anne Pien, who says that her willingness to die on Mars has seriously strained her relationship with her girlfriend.

Meanwhile, one Virginia man was philosophical about his wife’s desire to leave the planet.

And Entertainment Weekly has the trailer for Citizen Mars, which profiles five of the candidates.

Whatever you may think of the Mars One mission – it is pretty interesting to find out more about people who say they are perfectly willing to abandon Earth forever. We look forward to more interviews.

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