Issue #3(17) 2018 Astronautics

Developing wearable technologies for space and Earth

David Alexander Rice Space Institute, Houston, Texas, USA
Chris Culbert NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Kate Rubins NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Chris Gerty NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA

As NASA prepares to send humans to the Moon and later to Mars, a new set of technologies is paving the way for a more integrated and versatile approach to astronaut monitoring and interaction with their environment. Advances in wearable technologies are revolutionising how humans engage with the worlds around them, providing instantaneous information on internal and external conditions, and converting a wealth of data into usable knowledge. These advances are enabling NASA to envision an integrated data environment within which to monitor crew health, accelerate crew training and provide operational guidance in real-time. At the same time, technology translation between terrestrial and space applications is generating a wide range of benefits to space exploration, ground-based healthcare and human social interaction.

The functionality and purpose of wearable technologies can be categorized in a number of different ways depending upon the particular emphasis being highlighted. Here, we focus on the purpose of the technology and consider functionality as a secondary consideration designed to meet the specific purpose. To this end, we have separated our discussion into four distinct purposes: internal sensing, external sensing, augmented sensing and diagnostic sensing.

To continue reading this premium article, subscribe now for unlimited access to all online content

If you already have a login and password to access www.room.eu.com - Please log in to be able to read all the articles of the site.

Popular articles

See also

Astronautics

European lab in the sky: OP-SAT and new potential for ESA spacecraft

Environment

Rare Mercury transit complete

Astronautics

Third quarter phenomenon - the psychology of time in space

Popular articles

Some 2.2 billion people lack access to safely managed drinking water and over 4.2 billion people lack safely managed sanitation. Global monitoring of potable water can identify issues of water security for certain regions, water pipeline monitoring can help to identify problems and leaks in water systems and weather monitoring satellites can forewarn of potentially hazardous conditions that could affect waterways and systems. Astronautics

Space in support of sustainable development

Astroscale launched its ELSA-d mission in March 2021. ELSA-d consists of two satellites stacked together - a servicer designed to safely remove debris from orbit and a client satellite that serves as a piece of replica debris. Astronautics

Developing an in-orbit servicing and manufacturing economy