Issue #2(24) 2020 Lounge

Trailblazing STEM education

Bob Griesmer Virginia Air & Space Center, VA, USA

No-one in the space community would deny the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) education to the younger generation and the populace as a whole. But agreement does not always result in action. Bob Griesmer recognises the shortfalls and describes a US home-grown solution.

I remember the magic of that night sky in 1957. The grass soaked my back as I peered upward in search of that moving, beeping beacon. The sky was crystal clear, the Milky Way unpolluted by city lights. Sputnik would kick off a decade-long race to the Moon. Ten years; why so long? That was a lifetime for this ten year old.

The capsules that followed - the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo - were my generation’s ‘covered wagons of the new frontier’ that John Kennedy held out as a promise. This was our manifest destiny. We who thought, even at a young age, that there were no mountains we could not climb, no alien planets we could not conquer, would come to consider science as a calling in our brave new world.

To continue reading this premium article, subscribe now for unlimited access to all online content

If you already have a login and password to access www.room.eu.com - Please log in to be able to read all the articles of the site.

Popular articles

See also

Science

Publish or perish: the astronomer’s dilemma

Astronautics

Long-term spaceflight and microbiological safety issues

Security

Defending Earth against cosmic hazards

Popular articles

Astronautics

De Ayrshire ad Astra

  Frank De Winne poses for a photo near a window in the Japanese Kibo laboratory during his ISS mission as Expedition 20 flight engineer. Astronautics

International cooperation - the key to survival on Earth and in space